image text special

'When We Were Trolls (WWWT)' by Caroline Delieutraz at 22,48 m2, Paris

article image; primary-color: #CECDC8;
article image; primary-color: #D0CFCB;
article image; primary-color: #CDCCCA;
article image; primary-color: #C6C3BA;
article image; primary-color: #E5E5E5;
article image; primary-color: #DAD9D5;
article image; primary-color: #D0CDC6;
article image; primary-color: #D1D1C7;
article image; primary-color: #CECAC1;
article image; primary-color: #CFC7BA;
article image; primary-color: #AEAEA4;
article image; primary-color: #B3B3AB;
article image; primary-color: #CFCECA;
article image; primary-color: #CCCBC6;
article image; primary-color: #BEBBB4;
article image; primary-color: #DCD5C5;

Caroline Delieutraz’s upcoming solo exhibition at the 22.48 m2 gallery showcases the continuation of her work regarding the circulation of images in the age of Internet and social networks. The artist's new pieces focus on internet violence and the myths that determine it. 

In the exhibition When We Were Trolls (WWWT), Caroline Delieutraz explores the more sinister aspects of the Internet through the figure of the "troll". This term is used to describe people who deliberately post inopportune or excessive comments with the intention to disrupt online communities and to elicit strong reactions from other users. Over the years, trolling has acquired a particularly threatening aura, owing to its use in attempts at political destabilization as well as the level of violence that is sometimes involved, including cases of group harassment. 

Based on a series of interviews with a certain Aurélien, as well as the contents of his hard drive, Caroline Delieutraz is able to draw the digital portrait of a particularly effective troll, having operated in the years 2000 and 2010. Through the use of masks and avatars, she develops a form of documentary writing which drifts from a virtual space (albeit one with very real implications) to a sort of bitter dreamscape. The artist explores the strategies deployed by the self-proclaimed "king of trolls" as a game of attraction/repulsion. She depicts the pride-tinged confessions of a self-professed sociopath using elements which are made ambiguous by the very act of trolling and its assumed anonymity, thus straddling the line between pieces of evidence and trophies. These fragments of Internet’s recent history reveal the paradoxes of a socially inadequate world, in which harassment is interwoven with rhetoric and play, and in which one’s intelligence is used to harm others for “fun”, randomly striking at “what is public but is not great”. 

— Philippe Bettinelli

12.9.19 — 9.11.19

Photo by Aurélien Mole

2248 m2

'Camouflage', Off-Site Show by prsntprsnt in Shui Long Wo, Sai Kung, Hong Kong

'LMXJVSD' by Marina G Guerreiro at Pols, Valencia

'Glossy Inviolability' by Zsófia Keresztes at Elijah Wheat Showroom, New York

'Eye to Eye Delirium' by Sofia Sinibaldi at Interstate Projects, New York

'A Tinkling Sound', a Group Show at Kunsthalle Wichita

'I am Thankful to be a Ghost Now', a Group Show at Aldea Gallery, Bergen

PALAZZINA #03: Melanie Akeret, Haydée Marin, Hannes Zulauf at Palazzina, Basel

'Tiredness Quotes' by Barbora Zentková & Julia Gryboś at Karlin Studios, Prague

'New Psychedelia of Industrial Healing' by Sharona Franklin at King’s Leap, New Y

'Another Night in Dream City' by Seán Boylan at Stranger, Baltimore

'I SAW A CROW, ORCA WAS I' by Alison Yip at Monte Clark Gallery, Vancouver

'DIGESTING DUCK ENTRY LEVEL POSITION' by Isabelle Frances McGuire at From the Des

'Access Modes for Encountering Large Industrial Bodies' by Kitty Maria at Het Res

'La ballade des sardines – Die Liebe der Sardinen' by Robert Brambora at Sans tit

'Weathered Shabby Shabby Brenches: Vernal Festivity of the Four Clari' by MRZB at

'Rose Button' by Romain Vicari at Placement Produit, Aubervilliers

'리좀적 주문 Rhizomatic Spell', a Group Show at Kvalitář, Prague

'Die ZWEITE HAND' by Niclas Riepshoff at Stadium, Berlin

More