image text special shop

'The Garden' by Hilary Galbreaith at +DEDE, Berlin

article image; primary-color: #96706D;
article image; primary-color: #783271;
article image; primary-color: #674661;
article image; primary-color: #55294C;
article image; primary-color: #704B5D;
article image; primary-color: #942E84;
article image; primary-color: #741D6C;
article image; primary-color: #55374F;
article image; primary-color: #7F2086;
article image; primary-color: #624F51;
article image; primary-color: #837076;
article image; primary-color: #B1A39A;
article image; primary-color: #DAD3C9;
article image; primary-color: #ACAA9D;
article image; primary-color: #B7BDBB;
article image; primary-color: #BEBCB0;
article image; primary-color: #D6D8D7;
article image; primary-color: #A7A558;
article image; primary-color: #C8BF74;
article image; primary-color: #7F806E;

In her new solo show, entitled The Garden, Hilary Galbreaith presents episode two of her puppet science fiction series. In the world of New New Orleans, where a disease results in the transformation of certain humans into insects, a television competition takes place, in which the mutants are the protagonists. If the first episode we observed the grotesque administrative difficulties dealt with by the mutants, the episode of The Garden stages a return to nature as an evasion from this dystopian world. This slow life appears at first to have stemmed from a desire for an alternative, reduced lifestyle ; it is, however, false, part of the reality television show that structures this world within a world. In the logic of the artist, the "garden" symbolizes the culture of fake, in its reproduction of nature with artifice.

Hilary Galbreaith prefers to work as an autodidact, learning new skills through tutorials she finds on the internet. Thus, she develops a pop, do-it-yourself aesthetic where customized odor diffusers stand alongside crocheted flowers. Her visual and conceptual influences are very American, such as those of Mike Kelley or Paul McCarthy. The artist is especially interested in fantasy and fantasy literature - this seems obvious in her narrations - from Poe to Pratchett, and dissects the horror film, citing Rosemary's Baby and Night of the Living Dead. Considered as a whole, the exhibition is at once auditory, olfactory and participative, with furniture designed especially for the occasion. She thus creates what art historians refer to as a Gesamtkunstwerk.

— Loïc Le Gall

23.8.19 — 30.8.19

Featuring the music of Attic Ted, David Donovan, Christophe Scarpa, and Simon Thibert

Video produced by In Extenso

Curated by Loïc Le Gall in partnership with Bonnevalle

+DEDE

'Shadow Banned' by Michael Bussell at Plague Space, Krasnodar

'The Fault in our Stars' by Dimitris Gketsis at The Breeder, Athens

'Boreal Throne', Off-Site Group Project at Smena, Kazan

'BUZZ' by Karina Mendreczky, Katalin Kortmann Járay at FKSE Studio of Young Artis

'Dieu' by Mélanie Matranga at High Art, Paris

'Fantasy Lands' by Maggie Dunlap & Allan Gardner at Collective Ending, London

'Dead Season' by Vitaly Bezpalov & Karina Azizova at Spas Setun, Moscow

'Duru Duru' by Stefano Serusi at Galleria Arrivada, Milan

'Ø' by Andrea Nacciarriti at DISPLAY, Parma

'Vore' by Jenkin van Zyl at Rose Easton, London

'Bigag & The Bando' by Theodor Nymark at aaaa Nordhavn, Copenhagen

'Mitla' by Andy Medina at Estrella Gallery, New York

'INSIDE OUT' by Poupak Sarah Shoughi at Herrretics, Derbyshire

'LIBERTY' by Débora Delmar at GALLLERIA PÌU, Bologna

'HEARTH' by Liam Denny at Greenhouse Off-Site, Melbourne

'CANDALÙ' by Rachele Maistrello at Almanac, Turin

'Thought-Forms' by Andy Ralph Presented by Final Hot Desert, Nephi, Utah

'The Laws Of Hospitality' by Travis John Ficarra at Lindberg Galleries, Melbourne

Next Page