image text special

'WHY ARE WE MAD?' by Wieland Schönfelder at Ashley, Berlin

article image; primary-color: #17161B;
article image; primary-color: #8A8685;
article image; primary-color: #333237;
article image; primary-color: #39383E;
article image; primary-color: #3E3E3C;
article image; primary-color: #5C5C5C;
article image; primary-color: #44413C;
article image; primary-color: #737782;
article image; primary-color: #2E3138;
article image; primary-color: #D8D7D5;
article image; primary-color: #0A090E;
article image; primary-color: #36353B;
article image; primary-color: #A19C98;
article image; primary-color: #101012;
article image; primary-color: #B5B4B0;
article image; primary-color: #1A1A1A;
article image; primary-color: #CECCCF;
article image; primary-color: #CFCECC;
article image; primary-color: #D3CFD0;
article image; primary-color: #CCCECD;

Order incessantly disintegrates into chaos. The mind rebuilds structures from the ashes and re-establishes order, so that chaos becomes the cosmos. Then everything collapses again. This cycle is familiar, it’s how we experience time. The artificial intelligence in the scenographic installations of Wieland Schönfelder (Berlin, 1985) break this cycle. They are abstractions, living mathematics that resist time and life.

In his installation WHY ARE WE MAD? Pinocchio-like droid cowboys populate the exhibition as small-scale 3D prints or computer animations. Peculiar beings between man, doll, and automat, looped, frozen in absurd actions, and in some moments pensively aware of their existence. A puppet master is at work here. He steers and is steered. The American author Thomas Ligotti sees this ambivalent figure in his poem "I have a special plan for this World" as a metaphor for our actual human existence. Ligotti’s poem is one of many tropes from popular culture, cinema and literature that Wieland Schönfelder spins together into an absurdist sub-world of collective consciousness: in the video the computer-animated figures stroll through a Wild West landscape made of metal, the physical figures are arrested before a backdrop of naïve Brothers Grimm gone Disney as wallpaper.

Using the 3D printed sculptures as a point of departure, Wieland Schönfelder expands his multimedia installations into tangible scenographies. The fiction of the imagined world seeps into actual space. And while Schönfelder, who started his artistic career in theater, gradually transforms the imagined into the real with each of his different media, he conversely poses the question of whether our life is not itself a sum of fictional narratives.

31.9.19 — 27.10.19

Ashley

'Glossy Inviolability' by Zsófia Keresztes at Elijah Wheat Showroom, New York

'Eye to Eye Delirium' by Sofia Sinibaldi at Interstate Projects, New York

'A Tinkling Sound', a Group Show at Kunsthalle Wichita

'I am Thankful to be a Ghost Now', a Group Show at Aldea Gallery, Bergen

PALAZZINA #03: Melanie Akeret, Haydée Marin, Hannes Zulauf at Palazzina, Basel

'Tiredness Quotes' by Barbora Zentková & Julia Gryboś at Karlin Studios, Prague

'New Psychedelia of Industrial Healing' by Sharona Franklin at King’s Leap, New Y

'Another Night in Dream City' by Seán Boylan at Stranger, Baltimore

'I SAW A CROW, ORCA WAS I' by Alison Yip at Monte Clark Gallery, Vancouver

'DIGESTING DUCK ENTRY LEVEL POSITION' by Isabelle Frances McGuire at From the Des

'Access Modes for Encountering Large Industrial Bodies' by Kitty Maria at Het Res

'La ballade des sardines – Die Liebe der Sardinen' by Robert Brambora at Sans tit

'Weathered Shabby Shabby Brenches: Vernal Festivity of the Four Clari' by MRZB at

'Rose Button' by Romain Vicari at Placement Produit, Aubervilliers

'리좀적 주문 Rhizomatic Spell', a Group Show at Kvalitář, Prague

'Die ZWEITE HAND' by Niclas Riepshoff at Stadium, Berlin

'Bit Rot' by Bob Bicknell-Knight at Broadway Studio and Gallery, Letchworth Garde

'ALL ONE' by MYLASHER / Tine Günther at The Complex, Dublin

More