image text special

'The Harpist Rover' by Anna Solal at Interstate Projects, New York

article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image
article image

What is the capacity of an object? What is the meaning of material? Can they be transformed or are they transformative? ese are some of the questions being asked in the works of Solal whose use of the everyday envisions what types of worlds are possible.

Solal uses objects found on the street or in dollar stores not for their original function but to incorporate and give new life to waste and the throw-away economy of the capitalist world. Most of these materials, from the city streets of Paris and New York, are cheap plastics, metals, and achromatic in their generic qualities. By reincorporating them into new sculptural forms, Solal diverts their pragmatic and primary function into oneiric dimensions.

As a result of this process, her sculptures take on an archaic or fantastical quality with a touch of the futu- ristic. Solal’s vision of the future is one where objects are a kind of animal or vegetation that would be able to evolve a er being abandoned without human presence. ese works imagine a post-human existence and create a survival esthetic, but one that is playful. Humor is essential for Solal as the idea of play represents resistance because is introduces improvisation, absurdity and dreams.

She accomplishes dichotomies of meaning by using a combination of materials and mediums. Embedded into the sculptures are detailed drawings that give micro and macro views of nature and private domestic in- teriors. ey are a cosmology of the vast and intimacy of everyday life. is exhibition also focuses on aerial dimensions; kites, birds, satellites and musical notes in the air reside in this space and also expand usually pop iconographies into wild low- romantic zones.

Her primitive stylization is both impulsive but aware of its implications and Solal draws in uence from sources ranging from Mayan iconography, Cronenberg lms and Walker Evans photography. Drawing on a myriad of sources destabilizes the expectation of time, meaning and mythologized symbols. Solal uses naïve gurations intermixed with urban materials to express lyric discharge where brutality and tenderness are entwined.

24.3.17 — 7.5.17

Interstate Projects

preview image

'Glazed & Confused', a Group Show at Fonda, Leipzig

preview image

'Northern Lights', a Group Show at Alta Art Space, Malmö

preview image

'HOT BABAS' by Ieva Kraule-Kūna at Creative Studio of the ARSENĀLS, Riga

preview image

'Cat Scratch Fever' by Philip Hinge at Step Sister, New York

preview image

'ça va bien, mais ça va mal' by Merzedes Šturm-Lie at Komplot @ Chateau Nour, Bru

preview image

'THE KING’S TWO BODIES' by Bea Orlandi at Interstate Projects, New York

preview image

'Everyday Is in Eternity Bound', a Group Show at WallRiss, Fribourg

preview image

'Kyffhäuserstraße 31', a Group Show at Ginerva Gambino, Cologne

preview image

'The Clan Of Softness And Honor ' by Anna Slama & Marek Delong at Berlinskej Mode

preview image

'Halo in a Hayloft' by Noel Freibert at Lubov, New York

preview image

'A SCENARIO FOR A SILENT PLAY' by Sébastien Rémy at Les Bains-Douches, Alençon

preview image

'Leona, Leone' by Bea Fremderman and Loreta Lamargese at La Kaje, New York

preview image

'Taken and martyred by strangers' by Jakub Glinski at Town Culture Centre, Gorzów

preview image

'It moves and it shouts', a Group Show at Haus N Athen, Athens

preview image

'Galvanic Couple' by Irina Lotarevich at Futura, Prague

preview image

Katja Novitskova at Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin

preview image

Aniara Omann at Humber Street Gallery, Hull

preview image

'Barry Walking Himself' by Anastasia Sosunova at Kogo, Tartu

More